Education Legislation

 

 

 

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The following link shows the State Regulation on Private Schools for each State of the United Sates of America from the U.S. Department of Education 

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On page 267, you can find  an excerpt For Texas current Education Legislation applicable to Marble Falls Academy

https://www2.ed.gov/admins/comm/choice/regprivschl/regprivschl.pdf/regprivschl/regprivschl.pdf

Private Schools

Accreditation, Registration, Licensing, and Approval

  • Accreditation: optional
    • The accreditation of nonpublic schools through the Texas Private School Accreditation Commission (TEPSAC) became effective on February 12, 1986. The Texas Education Agency ceased directly accrediting nonpublic schools after May 31, 1989. Through a letter of understanding, the commissioner of education recognizes the accreditation of nonpublic schools accredited by associations that are members of TEPSAC.
  • Registration: no requirements
  • Licensing: no requirements
  • Approval: no requirements

Teacher Certification

  • Teacher certification is not required for private schools.
  • All teachers in accredited private schools must be “highly qualified,” but each accrediting agency is allowed to define what that means as part of its approval process. The accrediting agency may choose to use the Texas state teacher certification or may develop its own standards, as long as they are higher than those for the Texas state teacher certification. The accrediting agency also has the option of recognizing out-of-state credentials. TEPSAC Policy Book.

Length of School Year and Days

  • Accredited private schools must meet or exceed the minimum seat time required of public schools. TEPSAC Policy Book.

Curriculum

  • Students attending a private or parochial school are exempt from compulsory attendance at a public school if the school includes in its course a study of good citizenship. Texas Education Code Ann. §25.086(a)(1).
  • A transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school must complete all state requirements found in Texas Administrative Code, Title 19, Part II, §74.11(d)(1) for graduation. Texas Administrative Code, Title 19, Part II, §74.11(f).
  • The district may use a variety of methods to verify the content of courses for which a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school has earned credit. Texas Administrative Code, Title 19, Part II, §74.26(a)(2).
  • Parochial and private schools are expected to observe Texas Week the week of March 2. Texas Civil Statute Article 6144a.

Recordkeeping and Reports

  • A school district must ensure that records or transcripts of a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school are evaluated and that the student is placed in appropriate classes promptly. Texas Administrative Code, Title 19, Part II, §74.26 (a)(2).
  • An institution of higher education is not permitted to require an applicant who presents evidence of successful completion of a nontraditional secondary education (which includes a nonaccredited private school) to obtain a general education development certificate, certificate of high school equivalency, or other credentials equivalent to a public high school degree; or to take an assessment not generally required of applicants. Texas Education Code §51.9241.

Home Schools

  • Texas has no laws or regulations related to homeschooling. The state of Texas does not regulate, monitor, approve, register, or accredit programs available to parents who choose to homeschool their children. In addition, the state of Texas does not award a diploma to students who are homeschooled. However, in accordance with Texas Education Code §51.9241, the state of Texas considers the successful completion of a homeschool education to be equivalent to graduation from a public or private high school.

Initial and Renewal Applications

  • No state policy currently exists.

Curriculum and Instruction

  • Under the Texas Supreme Court decision rendered in Leeper et al. vs. Arlington Independent School District et al. a homeschool curriculum must be designed to meet a minimum of basic education goals including reading, spelling, grammar, mathematics, and a study of good citizenship.
  • A home school will be considered a private school for the provision of services for children with disabilities if it provides elementary or secondary education that includes a curriculum designed to meet basic education goals, with a scope and sequential progress of courses and a review and documentation of student progress in place. Texas Administrative Code, Title 19, Part II, §89.1096

Assessment and Diplomas

  • An institution of higher education is not permitted to require an applicant who presents evidence of successful completion of a nontraditional secondary education (which includes homeschooling) to obtain a general education development certificate, certificate of high school equivalency, or other credentials equivalent to a public high school degree; or to take an assessment not generally required of applicants. Texas Education Code §51.9241.

Public School Access

  • No state policy currently exists.

Web Resources

Information and Legislation

Contact Information – State and Federal Departments of Education

  • Texas Education Agency
    1701 North Congress Avenue
    Austin, TX 78701-1494
    Phone: (512) 463-9734
    Fax: (512) 463-9838
    Email: teainfo@tea.state.tx.us Website: http://tea.texas.gov/
  • U.S. Department of Education, Texas